KinetX Aerospace — Providing Visionary, Highly Prized Engineering in Support of Space- and Earth-Based Endeavors

 

 

Published Papers
  • Messenger Navigation Operations During the Mercury Orbital Mission Phase — 10 Feb - 14 Feb 2013 The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission is the seventh in NASA’s Discovery Program. The spacecraft was launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in August 2004 to begin an interplanetary cruise that culminated in orbit insertion about Mercury in March 2011 for a nominal one-year scientific investigation. An extension to the mission was initiated in March 2012, and in order to optimize the scope and return of the onboard scientific instruments and the stability of the spacecraft orbit about the planet, the orbital period was reduced from 12 to 8 hours in April 2012. This paper describes MESSENGER navigation operations and trajectory estimation performance for the orbital mission phase from Mercury orbit insertion through the end of the primary mission and into the first 9 months of the ongoing extended mission. AAS/AIAA Space Flight Mechanics Conference – AAS 13-383
    Authors: Brian R. Page, Christopher G. Bryan, Kenneth E. Williams, Anthony H. Taylor, Dale R. Stanbridge, Peter J. Wolff, and Bobby G. Williams – KinetX Aerospace, Inc., Space Navigation and Flight Dynamics, Simi Valley, California
  • Optical Navigation Capabilities for Deep Space Missions — 10 Feb - 14 Feb 2013 KinetX Aerospace, a private corporation, is currently providing navigation for three NASA deep space missions: MESSENGER, New Horizons, and OSIRISREx. Two of these, New Horizons to the Pluto system, and OSIRIS-REx to the asteroid 1999 RQ36, rely heavily on optical navigation (OpNav) to ensure mission success. KinetX-developed OpNav software uses spacecraft imaging to determine the spacecraft trajectory and targets’ ephemerides. This paper describes the KinetX approach to optical navigation, simulating spacecraft images for testing, processing real data, and generating products for orbit determination. Also included are imaging simulations for New Horizons and OSIRIS-REx and real data results from New Horizons. AAS/AIAA Space Flight Mechanics Conference – AAS 13-443
    Authors: Coralie D. Jackman and Philip J. Dumont – KinetX Aerospace, Inc., Space Navigation and Flight Dynamics, Simi Valley, California
  • Applying Experience from Mercury Encounters to MESSENGER’s Mercury Orbit Mission — 31 Jul - 01 Aug 2011 The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission is the seventh mission in NASA’s Discovery Program series.  The spacecraft was launched in August 2004 and began an interplanetary cruise that culminated in insertion into orbit about Mercury in March of 2011 for a nominal one-year scientific investigation.  The cruise phase included six planetary gravity-assist flybys and eighteen propulsive events, which included five large deep-space maneuvers, one in two parts, and twelve smaller trajectory-correction burns.  From the approach to the first Mercury flyby through orbital insertion about the innermost planet, an interval that spanned over three years, solar sailing was employed successfully for trajectory correction.  This paper describes the navigation performance achieved for the three Mercury flybys and how experiences gained during the mission cruise phase have been applied to support Mercury orbit insertion and maintenance operations during the Mercury orbital phase of the MESSENGER mission. AAS/AIAA Astrodynamics Specialist Conference – AAS 11-549
    Authors: Brian R. Page, Kenneth E. Williams, Anthony H. Taylor, Dale R. Stanbridge, Christopher G. Bryan, Peter J. Wolff, and Bobby G. Williams – KinetX Aerospace, Inc., Space Navigation and Flight Dynamics, Simi Valley, California; Daniel J. O’Shaughnessy and Sarah H. Flanigan – The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland
  • Achievable Force Model Accuracies for MESSENGER in Mercury Orbit — 31 Jul - 01 Aug 2011 The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission is the seventh mission in NASA’s Discovery Program.  The spacecraft, launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in August 2004, arrived in orbit about Mercury in March 2011 to begin a one-year scientific investigation.  While in orbit, the spacecraft is subject to a variety of forces, including Mercury and solar gravity, solar and planetary radiation effects, and propulsive events associated with orbit correction and momentum desaturation.  This paper describes the challenges for navigation in terms of achieving the highest accuracy possible for relevant force models to support orbit determination and reconstruction over the Mercury orbital phase of the MESSENGER mission. AAS/AIAA Astrodynamics Specialist Conference – AAS 11-548
    Authors: Dale R. Stanbridge, Kenneth E. Williams, Anthony H. Taylor, Brian R. Page, Christopher G. Bryan, David W. Dunham, Peter Wolff, and Bobby G. Williams – KinetX Aerospace Space Navigation and Flight Dynamics, Simi Valley, California; James V. McAdams, and Dawn P. Moessner – The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland
  • Advanced Navigation Strategies for an Asteroid Sample Return Mission — 31 Jul - 01 Aug 2011 The proximity operations phases of a sample retuen mission to an asteroid have been analyzed using advanced navigation techniques derived from experience gained in planetary exploration.  These techniques rely on tracking types such as Earth-based radio metric Doppler and ranging, spacecraft-based ranging, and optical navigation using images of landmarks on the asteroid surface.  Navigation strategies for the orbital phases leading up to sample collection, the touch down for collecting the sample, and the post sample collection phase at the asteroid are included.  Options for successfully executing the phases are studied using covariance analysis and Monte Carlo simulations of an example mission to the Earth asteroid 4660 Nereus.  The landing options were studied including trajectories with either one or two burns from orbit to the surface.  Additionally, a comparison of post-sample collection strategies is presented.  These strategies include remaining in orbit about the asteroid or standing-off a given distance until departure to Earth. AAS/AIAA Astrodynamics Specialist Conference – AAS 11-499
    Authors: J. Bauman, B. Williams, and K. Williams – KinetX Aerospace, Inc. Space Navigation and Flight Dynamics, Simi Valley, California; K. Getzandanner – Navigation & Mission Design Branch, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland
  • Algorithms for MUOS Capacity Analysis — 29-31, Oct 2007 The Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) for satellite communications (SATCOM) is being developed to provide important beyond line-of-sight (BLOS) communications for tactical military users.  There is a keen interest in the MUOS data rate capacity as it relates to the available system bandwidth.  A set of wide-band code-division multiple access (WCDMA) waveforms will be used to share bandwidth among users and so multiple access interference (MAI) must be considered in evaluating system capacity.  In addition, frequency reuse is accomplished based on the employment of multiple satellite beams.  While this improves the system capacity, it complicates the supportability analysis because adjacent beam interference can increase the MAI and, as a result, can impact system capacity.  The purpose of this paper is to develop algorithms that determine supportability for a given set of links in the MUOS system… Authors: Jim Marshall, Dr. Lynam Hazelton, Parimal Pal, Per Kullstam, Anne Grigals
  • Early Navigation Results for NASA’s MESSENGER Mission to Mercury — 23-27 Jan 2005 MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission is being flown as the seventh mission in NASA’s Discovery Program.  The MESSENGER mission is led by the principal investigator, Sean C. Solomon, of the Carnegie Institution of Washington.  The project is managed by and the spacecraft was built and is operated by The John Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory.  Navigation for the spacecraft is provided by the Space Navigation and Flight Dynamics Practice of KinetX Aerospace, Inc., a private corporation… 15th AAS/AIAA Space Flight Mechanics Conference – AAS 05-176
    Authors: B. Williams, A. Taylor, E. Carranza, J. Miller, D. Stanbridge, B. Page, D. Cotter, and L. Efron – KinetX Aerospace, Inc., Space Navigation and Flight Dynamics, Simi Valley, California; R. Farquhar, J. McAdams, and D. Dunham – The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, Maryland
  • Configurable Spacecraft Control Architectures for On-Orbit Servicing and Upgrading of Long Life Orbital Platforms — 06-13 Mar 2004 Large orbital platforms provide unique and essential space-based capabilities for science, intelligence, and defense missions potentially supporting very large aperture imagers, antenna farms, SARs, radiometers and other systems.  In order to provide maximum return on the investment required, it is essential to have a significant autonomous on-orbit servicing, upgrade and repair capability such that the platform can operate successfully for decades and have new platforms added to it… 2004 IEEE Aerospace Conference Proceedings
    Authors: James Ross, Honeywell DSES, Glendale, Colorado; David Musliner, Honeywell Laboratories, Minneapolis, Minnesota; Thomas Kreider, Honeywell DSES, Glendale, Colorado; Jack Jacobs, Honeywell DSES, Glendale, Colorado; Michael Fisher, KinetX Aerospace, Inc., Tempe, Arizona
  • The B612 Mission Design — 23-26 Feb 2004 This paper describes a mission proposed by the B612 Foundation to demonstrate the feasibility of docking a spacecraft with a small asteroid and applying a controlled, steady thrust to it in order to measurably alter the asteroid's orbit and rotation pole by the year 2015.  The target would be a rocky 200-meter asteroid with a mass of about 10 billion kilograms that does not pose any impact threat to the Earth… AIAA 2004 Planetary Defense Conference: Protecting Earth from Asteroids — AIAA 2004-1448
    Authors: B. G. Williams, KinetX Aerospace, Inc., Space Navigation and Flight Dynamics, Simi Valley, California; D. D. Durda, Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, Colorado; D. J. Scheeres, Department of Aerospace Engineering, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
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